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March 12, 2012

Supervisors endorse changes to county strategic plan

By Courtney Beale
Charlottesville Tomorrow
Monday, March 12, 2012

The Albemarle Board of Supervisors has approved the addition of two objectives to the county’s strategic plan that would direct staff to add education and public safety as priorities.

The county’s strategic plan is an over-arching document that sets general direction for financial planning over a five year period. It will take effect on July 1, 2012 and now has seven distinct goals with descriptive objectives.

“It seems like you’ve done what we asked you to do,” said Kenneth C. Boyd, member of the County Board of Supervisors.  “We had a work session on this before and this is what we asked to be done.”

The two new strategic goals are “ensure the health and safety of the community” and “provide excellent educational opportunities to all Albemarle residents.”

In order to provide better educational options, supervisors said they support a goal of increasing the amount and quality of pre-kindergarten education options while developing the adult workforce in this field.  

County staff has worked in conjunction with the Albemarle schools and the United Way to identify metrics for work-force development.

This resulted in the creation of a Work-Force Development Opportunities Action Plan that will pair with the Economic Vitality Action Plan adopted by Supervisors in 2010.

“We’ve identified work-force development in both of those places, so we’re going to make sure that they coordinate with each other,” said Thomas C. Foley, County Executive.

Continue reading "Supervisors endorse changes to county strategic plan" »

February 12, 2012

Meet Your Government: Ella Jordan

Ella Jordan

Clerk to the Board of Supervisors, Albemarle County
EllaJordan

Where were you born (and raised, if different)?

I was born in Charlottesville and grew up in Esmont, a small, tight-knit community in Southern Albemarle. 

When and why did you move to the Charlottesville/Albemarle area?

I’ve always lived in this area.  One of the reasons I stayed in the area was because I knew that it was a good area to raise my children.  I also have a deep connection with my family, friends and church.  

What neighborhood do you live in now?

Fifeville (Orangedale).

Family (spouse, kids, etc)?

My husband, Jay, is an Autobody Technician at Cville Auto Body; we have five children – Ian (24) in the Air Force, stationed in Montana; Zanathan (24), student at Liberty University; Kirstin (22) lives in New York, preparing for grad school; and twins, Jessica (19), student at University of Mary Washington, and Amanda (19), student at PVCC; and two grandchildren, Brooklynn and Joscelyn.

Continue reading "Meet Your Government: Ella Jordan" »

February 01, 2012

Live streaming of Albemarle Board of Supervisors meeting for February 1, 2012

 

Donate_white Can you help with a small gift to keep this broadcast ad-free

Charlottesville Tomorrow will be streaming a live audio broadcast of the February 1, 2012 meeting of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors.

Click here to view agenda materials from Albemarle County's website.


Broadcast starts at 9:00 am


Stream videos at Ustream

January 04, 2012

Live audio streaming of Albemarle Board of Supervisors January 4, 2012 meeting

 

Donate_white Can you help with a small gift to keep this broadcast ad-free

Charlottesville Tomorrow will be streaming a live audio broadcast of the Wednesday, January 4, 2012 meeting of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors.

Click here to view agenda materials from Albemarle County's website.


Broadcast starts at 9:00 am on January 4, 2011


Stream videos at Ustream

January 01, 2012

Board leadership, appointments could be contentious

DailyProgressBy Brian Wheeler
Charlottesville Tomorrow
Sunday, January 1, 2012

When the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors holds its first meeting of 2012 on Wednesday, members say they may immediately deadlock on the question of leadership and critical committee appointments.

Among the positions at stake are chairman and vice chairman of the Board of Supervisors and the two seats held by supervisors on the Metropolitan Planning Organization. The MPO is the key transportation funding and policy body that will have some oversight over the recently approved U.S. 29 Western Bypass project.

During the previous two years, a conservative majority consisting of three Republicans and one Democrat have held sway with 4-2 votes on a number of controversial issues, including the bypass and some environmental matters. That block’s de-facto leader is Supervisor Kenneth C. Boyd, who was just re-elected to a third term.

On these contentious issues, Boyd has been joined in the majority by fellow Republicans Duane E. Snow and Rodney S. Thomas and conservative Democrat Lindsay G. Dorrier Jr. With Dorrier’s retirement, and the election of Democrat Christopher J. Dumler to the open Scottsville District seat, the specter of split government may be returning to the County Office Building.

“The board has a 3-3 split that will probably emerge on some issues now that there’s no longer a 4-2 majority on Ken Boyd’s side,” said independent Supervisor Dennis S. Rooker.

Continue reading "Board leadership, appointments could be contentious" »

December 07, 2011

Live audio streaming of Albemarle Board of Supervisors December 7, 2011 meeting

 

Donate_white Can you help with a small gift to keep this broadcast ad-free

Charlottesville Tomorrow will be streaming a live audio broadcast of the Wednesday, December 7, 2011 meeting of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors.  

Click here to view agenda materials from Albemarle County's website.


Broadcast starts at 9:00 am on December 7, 2011


Stream videos at Ustream

November 01, 2011

Albemarle Supervisor candidates on city/county/UVa cooperation

image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.com
image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.com
In the run up to Election Day on November 8th, Charlottesville Tomorrow will once again mail out our in-depth nonpartisan voter guide, featuring exclusive one-on-one interviews with all the candidates for Albemarle County Board of Supervisors and Charlottesville City Council.  In the weeks before the election, we will feature one to two questions a day so that citizens like you can compare candidates’ answers and make an informed choice November 8th.

Charlottesville Tomorrow’s 2011 Election Center website features links to the full written transcript and audio of candidate interviews, as well as links to videos of candidate forums, copies of our 2011 voter guide, information on where to vote, and more.  All the following passages are excerpts from our interviews.

COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS, THIRD IN A SERIES

image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.comHow should the city, county and the University of Virginia work together to enhance our community’s unique character and economic vitality?


 

Rivanna District

Ken Boyd (R) – Incumbent

The county, the city and the university have a long history of collaborative discussions and actions.  We have a very different scenario from many regional communities in the commonwealth where the cities and counties don’t even try to work together.  These efforts, in such a diverse community, will inevitably lead to differences of opinion, but we deserve kudos for continuing the discussion.

I represented the board for several years on the county, city and UVA joint [Planning and Coordination Council] (PACC) committee and I have participated in countless discussions with both the city and the university.  These efforts have led to many collaborative ventures, including [the Charlottesville Albemarle Technical Education Center] (CATEC), and the Ivy Creek School, courts and jail authority, mass transportation, water, sewer, and solid waste, recycling, and may other joint ventures.  I expect we will continue to move in the same direction.

 

Cynthia Neff (D) – Challenger

Again, this is like an absolute great question.  It’s one that really resonates me … I don’t need a passport to come into the city.  We’re one place.  You know, I don’t understand these artificial constructs we’ve put up between us because they are inhibiting our progress.  And the same thing with UVA. 

… UVA is often an afterthought.  … [There are] millions and millions of dollars of procurement that the University of Virginia does and of course they go out to low bidders, but you know there’s a great opportunity for us to all sit down together with them and say, “Well, you know, let’s see what we could provide locally.” … maybe the city and the county we could work together in true economic development form and try to figure out how to give these our companies a chance to have like a little tax break or something so that they can compete and start to grow that business … the county can’t do that alone.

Continue reading "Albemarle Supervisor candidates on city/county/UVa cooperation" »

City Council candidates on city/county/UVa cooperation

image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.com

image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.com

In the run up to Election Day on November 8th, Charlottesville Tomorrow will once again mail out our in-depth nonpartisan voter guide, featuring exclusive one-on-one interviews with all the candidates for Albemarle County Board of Supervisors and Charlottesville City Council.  In the weeks before the election, we will feature one to two questions a day so that citizens like you can compare candidates’ answers and make an informed choice November 8th.

Charlottesville Tomorrow’s 2011 Election Center website features links to the full written transcript and audio of candidate interviews, as well as links to videos of candidate forums, copies of our 2011 voter guide, information on where to vote, and more.  All the following passages are excerpts from our interviews.

CITY COUNCIL, THIRD IN A SERIES

image from cvilletomorrow.typepad.comHow should the city, county and the University of Virginia work together to enhance our community’s unique character and economic vitality?


 

Scott Bandy (I) – Challenger

That’s been a bone of contention with some folks. County and city relations, I chalk that up to the fact that the city in a way conducts itself as if though were the county, and the county conducts itself as though it were the city. Look at the urban ring there. Commercial development. People moving out to the county. The city has lost a lot of residents, people that have moved from the city into the county. You go where the jobs are. The jobs happen to be mostly in the county. Not that we don’t have them in the city, certainly we do.

And of course, the University of Virginia. Let’s drag that into this. Certainly there is room for improvement. We could talk to each more. Not that we don’t already. But as Bob Fenwick said, as a city, we have a problem of talking things to death. The people want action. Whether that’s in the next few minutes or over a period of time. Certainly I am willing to extend the hand of cordialness and consideration to the university, to the county, to work on things together.

One of the things that is close to me that also involves the county is the Sunset-Fontaine Connector. The improvements are going to be in the county, but that improvement is going to dramatically affect the city. The residents along Old Lynchburg Road, that segment of Jefferson Park Avenue. They will be impacted when that  connector is ever completed and done. Perhaps once it is done, and certainly that’s one of the things I would be most interested in the county with, and of course, the university, because we have the Fontaine Avenue Research Park over there, of accomplishing. That impact would be that Jefferson Park Avenue, [Old] Lynchburg Road, could return to the status of a slower paced neighborhood street, not the cut-through as it is and has been currently used as. Let’s move on.

 

Brandon Collins (I) – Challenger

… I think everyone knows that things between the county and the city have not been great for quite some time.  I am looking forward to at some point getting beyond the [Meadow Creek] Parkway and the water supply plan, and in to really seeing what the county and the city have in common … We can cooperate a lot on a regional transit plan, or a regional transit authority, if there’s interest in the county for that.  I think in the long term we really need to make a list of priorities for the city when it comes to the county and determine which of those are really worth taking a stand for and what is somewhat negotiable …

Continue reading "City Council candidates on city/county/UVa cooperation" »

July 16, 2010

Supervisors delay decision on economic development action plan

By Bridgett Lynn
Charlottesville Tomorrow
Friday, July 16, 2010

No action has been taken yet by the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors to approve an economic development action plan that has been under review for the past two months.

Listen using player above or download the podcast: Download 20100714-BOS-Econ

“Probably one of the most overriding concerns that we heard [from the public] was that the plan did not provide adequate references to resource protection and possible impacts [to] quality of life,” said Lee Catlin, the county's Community Relations manager.

The plan calls for objectives to be met in five areas ranging from improving the county’s business climate to promoting agriculture and tourism.

20100714-Story  
Dawn Story speaks during the public hearing
According to staff, the plan has been revised to address issues of resource protection, the importance of jobs for current county residents, a measure of rural economy, and refocuses on nurturing existing enterprises as opposed to a primary focus on attracting new businesses into the community.

“All this is, is a plan for us to promote economic vitality in our community,” Supervisor Ken Boyd said. “It’s an important issue that needs to take front and center, and I think we’re through studying this. Let’s start moving forward with some of this action plan.”

Rich Collins, a member of Advocates for a Sustainable Albemarle Population (ASAP), criticized the plan and said it was “nothing but a growth plan.”

“It’s [not intended as] an idea to increase population in town. It’s really to provide jobs for our people,” Boyd responded.

Boyd also insisted that it would not negatively impact the county’s Comprehensive Plan.

“This is not some perfect document that we’re going to set that’s going to identify every single angle in the community,” Boyd said. “We’re still bound by the Comprehensive Plan no matter what we put in this document.”

The Board of Supervisors now anticipates a final vote on the action plan to occur at their August 4, 2010 meeting. That meeting will not include further public input opportunities on the plan.

July 08, 2010

Board of Supervisors encouraged by Historical Society’s plan for Old County Jail

DailyProgress
This article is an extended version of what appears in today's
Daily Progress.
By Jean Feroldi
Charlottesville Tomorrow
Thursday, July 8, 2010

The Albemarle County Board of Supervisors weighed Wednesday whether to retain a firm to study the historic Albemarle County Jail or to leave the task to the local historical society.

Steven Meeks, president of the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society, told the board that he did not think that a third-party consultant was necessary, saying his group could handle all the work except for legal evaluations.

“The society’s point of view is…we could undertake a lot of this work ourselves and save the county the $30,000 that could in turn be redirected toward the maintenance of the building,” Meeks said.

Built in 1876 on East High Street, the jail is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. A steering committee involving members from the Board of Supervisors, county staff and the historical society was established in 2008 to devise a strategy to reclaim the jail and preserve its architectural and social significance.

Raw-jail-web
As part of the process, Charlottesville architecture firm BushmanDreyfus was recommended to conduct a $30,000 study of the facility. County staff told the supervisors that they supported the historical society’s plan for the jail complex but thought that further legal, physical and operational evaluations were required.

“We recommend … that we proceed with the engagement of BushmanDreyfus architects to assist us with this effort,” said Bill Letteri, Albemarle County’s director of facilities development. “The focus of their work would be aligned specifically with the proposal of the historic society.”

Board members were not convinced that an outside consultant was needed, saying county staff could do the job more affordably.

Supervisor Kenneth C. Boyd said he did not think that the potential uses and expenses for the old jail should be the county’s concern.

“My opinion…would be to have private money taking care of this rather than the county to continue funding it,” Boyd said.

Supervisor Dennis Rooker felt that conveying the responsibility of the Old Jail to the historical society would be the best course of action.

“If the historic society can get in a position where they understand their proposed uses, what it would take to get there and we’re comfortable on our side then we could consider entering into an agreement and that would then put them into a position where they could fundraise,” Rooker said.
Raw-jail-2


Last year, the historical society agreed to take over the Hatton Ferry, another historical asset whose operations were deemed to be no longer suitable given the economic decline. Meeks told the Board that this has been a record year for the ferry, which is under operation for the first time as a non-profit organization.

The Old Jail complex has an unusual legal history because when it was originally obtained by the city in the 1870s, it did not lie within Charlottesville city limits. Later when it was annexed by the city, the county and city were to exercise joint police powers.

“To our knowledge there has never been any application of a joint exercise of power over this property,” said County Attorney Larry Davis. “So, [the jail] probably has no zoning. so in looking at the future use of this property, one issue that we are going to have to resolve is what legal approvals are going to be necessary for any use to be established there.”

The board recommended that the historical society come back later with additional research about how to realize its plan for the jail.